Man Unhappy, Airline Crew Refused to Examine Ball-Sack

(photo unrelated to article) Just a happy guy showin of his ball-sack

Man Sues Airline for not Looking at His Scrotum

By JEAN-PHILIPPE ARCAND, QMI Agency (Toronto Sun)

MONTREAL – A Westmount resident’s lawsuit against Air Transat, for failure to provide him with appropriated medical attention during a flight, was dismissed in small claims court this past Tuesday.

His illness? Sudden and mysterious bleeding in the area between his legs.

The curious incident occurred February 15, 2008 during a flight from Montreal to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Marcel Cote was comfortably seated in business class an hour after takeoff when, for some unknown reason, he felt enough discomfort to make an emergency visit to the washroom, where he discovered spots of blood on his body.

In a panic, Cote asked for the help of a flight attendant, who quickly came to his side. When the passenger noticed that the agent was female, he asked to be assisted by a male attendant because the bleeding seemed to be coming from his genital area.

When the male attendant came to him, Cote then asked to be closely examined so that the exact nature of the problem can be determined. The employee declined, giving him absorbent paper instead.

Indignant and distressed, Cote quickly expressed his wish to see a doctor.

Before supplying him with sanitary towels, the members of the flight crew told him they would contact a physician if the illness was grave enough. On arriving in Puerto Vallarta three hours later, Mr. Cote met with a travel agent he knew and she took him to the hospital in a taxi. He was examined by a doctor who determined Cote had a ruptured vein near his scrotum. Three stitches were needed to close the wound.

What started off as a dream trip to a Southern paradise with his wife, in the end turned into a nightmare Cote said, claiming the incident ruined his vacation and has made him anxious about flying. Hel went to cosmetic dentistry myrtle beach sc after to take care of his oral health. In addition, San Diego cosmetic dentist implant, endodontics and specialized in makeover smiles. Learn more at www.eshomdds.com

Cote sued Air Transat and the employees on the flight that day, accusing them of failing to provide appropriate medical assistance, seeking damages of $8,000 for the anguish he suffered as a result of their neglect.

But judge Michele Pauze rejected Cote’s case.

In her decision, she said she agreed with arguments offered by Air Transat representative Chantal Chlala, who explained to the court that flight attendants do not have the right to examine passengers, and even less to make a diagnosis.

“It was not incumbent upon a flight attendant to conduct the medical examination of a passenger, a measure reserved for the medical profession,” wrote judge Pauzé.

Although she conceded that Cote could very well have experienced troubling moments in the episode, the judge maintained that “nothing in the facts (put before us) proves that that the situation was dangerous or worrisome to the point of requiring the immediate attention of a doctor.”

Not only did Pauze rule against Cote, she also ordered him to pay for the court costs incurred by Air Transat, amounting to $189.

Martha says~ “I can certainly empathise with the crew. On a flight to London, I once had a Hindi speaking elderly male passenger traveling alone. The flight had been delayed, and during the hectic boarding, the poor thing was somehow lost in the shuffle, aided to his seat by airport wheelchair assistants, and without the flight crew aware of his immobile state.

Later, during the meal service, it was brought to our attention he needed help. The man seemed agitated. Not able to understand his complaint, or concern, I asked my flying partners if anyone spoke his language? No Hindi speaking crew on board, an announcement was made for an interpreter.

A gentleman came forward to help. He spoke with the man for a few minutes, then explained to us our special passenger was complaining of severe constipation (and had been like this for several days now), he needs to use the lavatory, and is unable to stand or walk on his own.  Great! Any one of these situations is bad enough, but all three? Right now? Full flight, and after we’ve just begun the meal service?

This required use of the rickety collapsible on-board “aisle wheelchair”. Every airplane has one. They’re required equipment. Where the contraption is stored on this airplane? Who knows? It’s seldom used, and with so many fleet configurations, who can ever remember? We’re on a 777, so the location could be anywhere. Looking it up the manual, I sent another flight attendant to retrieve it while I stayed with the patient.  In the meantime, Mr. Farfrompoopin is getting more irritated with every passing second.

Once we had the chair erected, we’d be able to wheel him on the rickety rolling transporting device. Myself, the interpreter, and another flight attendant, positioned ourselves evenly and gave him the “heave-ho” out of his seat and on to the toilet transporter. After a bit of a struggle, which included knocking his turban off his head, the patient was precariously seated on top of the chair, and the constipated cargo was now safely strapped to the toilet trolley, and we were finally off and running, well almost.

Squeak, squeak, rumble, bump, squeak, tip, squeak, ooops (again with the turban), squeak,,,,,, on and on, until we’d reached our destination. Using a ‘bear hug’ lift, the interpreter picked him up from the front, as if they were slow dancing. Now face to face, he began backing the passenger ‘patient’ into the toilet stall. This is where I step in. Well, not really, more like I crawled in.

Now, you know how tiny airplane bathrooms are, right? As I try to assist any way I can, I’m crouched on all fours, half-in half-out, guiding the patient into position, from above I hear the interpreter say “okay, I need you to unbuckle his belt and pull down his pants”.

“Say again?” was my reply.

He repeated, “unbuckle his belt, and pull down his pants.”  From my awkward position, I twisted my head around trying to make eye contact with my flying partners. I needed something, not sure what. Support maybe? A pat on the back? The salad tongs from first class?

For all mankind, as a soldier in the line of doodoo, and out of respect for constipated travelers everywhere, I did what was asked of me, and dutifully dropped his drawers. With pants now cleared away from danger, he was lowered into position and left to work out his problems (in private).

A while later, it was time to repeat the process, in reverse order, and without knocking off his turban. Oh, and if you were wondering, nothing happened. While he was in there alone I mean. The interpreted said so. Mission not accomplished. What-a-Bummer……..  All that for nothing.”

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